Thursday, November 19, 2015

Preserving Impacted Canine Teeth


The final emergence of permanent teeth in late adolescence marks the end of a long process beginning in the womb with the formation of our primary or "baby" teeth.  Permanent teeth form in a similar way as buds high in the jaw, continuing to grow until the primary teeth ahead of them fall away. The crowns of the new adult teeth eventually break through the gum tissue and emerge (erupt) into view.

At least, that's normally what should happen;  sometimes, though, a tooth may only erupt partially or not at all, a condition known as impaction. The crown remains partially or fully submerged below the gum line, causing the tooth to press other teeth, potentially damaging them. It can also make periodontal (gum) tissues adjacent to the area more susceptible to disease. Wisdom tooth are especially prone to this kind of impaction, to the extent they're often surgically removed (extracted) to avoid future problems to the adjacent teeth or the bite.

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